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CRY ON DEMAND

In my latest photographic series I am exploring the outward and inward appearances of subjects while Crying On Demand. As children some of us were in tears on an almost daily basis. With each passing year we learn how to control our emotions and reactions to situations of all types. I have been interested in the notion that as adults we move past emotion for the most part in our daily life. Charles Darwin once declared emotional tears “purposeless,” and nearly 150 years later, emotional crying remains one of the human body’s more confounding mysteries. Research shows that there are benefits to a good cry that leads to catharsis. There are also studies on how crying effects others around you. I certainly felt empathy towards my sitters during these sessions. With this in mind I began to explore what it would be like to capture a diverse series of adults of all ages letting go of their emotions and allowing themselves to Cry On Demand in front of the camera.

What I learned is that just below the surface many of us are holding back emotional responses. The way in which each subject was able to tap into that emotional vein and allow themselves to let go was something I found compelling. There were several who cried so deep that they became inconsolable. These particular sittings touched me deeply as I was able to have a glimpse of the sadness that some of us carry around. Several subjects were able to tap into the emotion by listening to music that carried them into it. There were a few that could not feel the moment and after a short time asked to be excused from the project. Many talked about the death of a loved one and this struck a deep chord with me. As I started this project I lost my brother in law to cancer as well as a cousin to the opioid crisis and I too was trying to find a way to deal with the emotions associated with loss. This project became something more personal to me after these events.

I want to thank my sitters for opening up for me and allowing me to be with them for this moment.
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
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by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
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by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
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by Robert Ascroft
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by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
by Robert Ascroft
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